Sony Lens Olive Branch MS

Camera Lenses directly impact the clarity of your shots. The many different shapes and sizes of camera lenses produce different effects. Continue reading to learn more about Sony lenses and get information on local companies and providers that will help you in your search.

Wolf Camera
(901) 753-4756
Germantown Collections 7850 Poplar Avenue Suite 6
Germantown, TN
 
Anixter Inc
(901) 363-0569
4550 S Mendenhall Rd Ste 101
Memphis, TN
 
American Camera And One Hour Photo
(901) 683-2200
5251 Poplar Ave
Memphis, TN
 
Wolf Camera & Image
(901) 278-1230
1540 Union Ave
Memphis, TN
 
Noone's Randy Deville Camera
(601) 956-9283
Jackson, MS
 
Wolf Camera
(901) 767-8646
4720 Poplar Avenue
Memphis, TN
 
Eaton Corporation
(901) 365-4600
4500 E Shelby Dr
Memphis, TN
 
Beepers 4 You
(901) 458-5058
2356 Park Ave
Memphis, TN
 
Best Buy
(901) 373-8787
2755 N Germantown Pkwy
Memphis, TN
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Sony High-Performance Zoom Lenses

Sony Expands Alpha Lens System With Two High-Performance Zooms

Sony Vario SonnarSAN DIEGO, Jan. 30, 2008 - Sony today announced two new high performance zoom lenses that offer α (alpha) digital SLR camera users more options for high picture quality.

Vario Sonnar T∗ 24-70mm f/2.8 ZA
Co-developed with Carl Zeiss®, the SAL2470Z model is a wide angle 24-70mm zoom lens with a large f/2.8 aperture, ideally suited for discerning landscape and portrait photography. Constructed of 17 elements in 13 groups with two aspheric elements and two extra-low dispersion elements, this lens exhibits excellent contrast and center-to-edge resolution. Its exclusive Carl Zeiss T∗ (T star) coating technology provides higher light transmission, and minimizes flare to produce images of luminous clarity, color and sharpness.

The SAL2470Z lens excels in difficult lighting circumstances thanks to its f/2.8 aperture, which remains constant throughout the focal length range. The nine-blade, circular iris is especially useful in controlling background defocusing in portrait and landscape images. Combined with Sony's in-camera Super SteadyShot® system, this lens is the only compatible large aperture standard zoom with the benefit of image stabilization available in the industry.

Quick and precise focusing is delivered by Sony's Super Sonic wave Motor (SSM) technology. This SSM system utilizes a solid-state focus drive motor that features silent, high-speed response with high-torque and fine rotational control - especially important for large, wide aperture lenses. A mode selector for manual and automatic focus as well as a focus hold control is provided on the lens barrel.

70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G
The SAL70300G lens incorporates the optical performance of Sony's G series in a compact and flexible telephoto zoom lens ideal for sports and portrait photography. Constructed of 16 elements in 11 groups, with one extra-low dispersion element, this lens offers superb contrast and sharpness across its wide focal length range.

The use of extra-low dispersion glass compensates for chromatic aberrations which challenge long telephoto zoom lens design, maintaining excellent optical characteristics from center to periphery. Internal focus construction not only realizes compact size, but also a close focusing capability of just 47 inches (1.2m), unusual for a lens of this focal length range.

Like the SAL2470Z, focus drive is provided by Sony's Super Sonic wave Motor (SSM) technology. Silent and highly accurate, the SSM system is ideal for providing larger lenses with the speed and rotational precision often required by telephoto shooting. To match auto focus operation to the situation, a focus range limiter can be set to a minimum distance of three meters. A lens barrel mounted focus hold button locks focus if desired.

Price and AvailabilityBoth lenses will be available this spring. The Vario-Sonnar T∗ 24-70mm f/2.8 ZA lens will be available for about $1,750 and the 7...

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