Outdoor Photographers Bismarck ND

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Outdoor Photographers. You will find helpful, informative articles about Outdoor Photographers, including "Five Ways to Shoot Good Photos in Bad Weather". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Bismarck, ND that will answer all of your questions about Outdoor Photographers.

Fowler Photography
(701) 222-3040
120 North 5th Street
Bismarck, ND
 
Robert Knutson Photography
(701) 258-0738
405 East SWeet Avenue
Bismarck, ND
 
Renner Photography
(701) 223-7622
301 1st Street Southeast
Mandan, ND
 
Phyne Photography
(701) 663-4515
120 West Main Street
Mandan, ND
 
Portraits by Amanda
(701) 361-4811
2390 13th st se
Bismarck , ND
Photographic Specialities
Wedding Photogrpahy
Company
Portraits by Amanda
Certifications
Graduate of Photography
Prices and/or Promotions
Weddings Starting at $1,500

Walker Dwayne Photography
(701) 258-2507
1847 Harding Place
Bismarck, ND
 
Photography by Scott Berge
(701) 223-6341
200 West Bowen Avenue
Bismarck, ND
 
Craig Schmidt Professional Photography
(701) 663-2774
404 13th Avenue Northwest
Mandan, ND
 
Eager Beaver Aerial Photos
(701) 255-1145
1023 W Highland Acres Rd
Bismarck, ND

Data Provided by:
Arvid Reimann Photography
(701) 839-3940
1609 31st Street Southwest
Minot, ND
 
Data Provided by:

Five Ways to Shoot Good Photos in Bad Weather

Five Ways To Shoot Good Photos in Bad Weather - 12/15/08

Change your Tactics With the Weather to Get Great Pictures.

You’ve got a day of outdoor shooting planned, and you’ve been looking forward to it for a while. Then on the morning of the big day there’s bad news: the weather isn’t cooperating. You were hoping for a sunny day of comfortable hiking and photographing. Now you’re faced with a dreary day, or a rainy day, or a windy day, or any number of other less-than-ideal days that Mother Nature has a knack for throwing your way when you’re not ready. So now what?

A lesser photographer may just say forget it and stay inside cleaning the gear, organizing the camera bag or just curling up for a nap. But you’re a dedicated photographer, and you’ve been looking forward to this day. No lousy weather is going to stand between you and a great shot. Go out anyway! Now you have an opportunity lesser photographers don’t: you can shoot in the interesting conditions that the weather has delivered just for you.

1. Overcast. If you’ve planned a day of autumn landscape photography you probably anticipated sunny skies and vibrant colored leaves. So on days when the weather’s dreary you’ve got to adjust your thinking. Realize that an overcast sky is often ideal for “quiet” landscape photographs.

Soft light means the skies and vistas may not be quite as bold, so focus in on the details and see what you can find. Look for downed leaves or detailed patterns in nature. In summer months, look to highlight large swaths of vegetation that are rendered nearly shadowless thanks to the flat sky. With the lower-contrast effects of shooting on a hazy day, shadows won’t be so bold and contrasty so you can see more details than normal. Graphic shadow-oriented compositions will be much harder to find today, but compositions that are geared toward softer, calmer effects are bound to work better on cloudy days. Start searching with that in mind.

2. Rain. Once you’ve taken care of protecting yourself and your gear from the water, imagine the possibilities that an atmosphere full of fast-moving water drops can add to your shots. Look for locations that will allow you to set up under some sort of protection—be it a dense tree canopy or even a building’s overhang—and try to shoot toward the light source. Backlit raindrops are a natural hit, but the typically hazy conditions of rainy days make them that much more of a challenge to find. If you see an opportunity—sun clearing after a shower, for example—make the most of that quickly changing dramatic light. And don’t forget about the optical and reflective qualities of water. Close-ups of droplets create amazing patterns, and they act like little lenses themselves. Wet leaves and rocks are bound to provide a different look than the typical detail shot on a drier day. Remember that water’s surface “sees” everything via reflection, so use that to your advantage.

3. Fog. Somewhe...

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