Olympus D-SLR Caldwell ID

Olympus Digital single lens reflex cameras are the camera of choice for the majority of professional photographers. They offer high quality, clear shots that can make any photographer impressed. Here you’ll find additional information on Olympus D-SLR as well as local companies and providers that may help you in your search.

F-Stop Camera & Video
(208) 726-3419
460 E Sun Valley Rd
Ketchum, ID
 
Inkley's
(208) 523-3000
396 Park Ave
Idaho Falls, ID
 
Inkley's
(208) 232-1398
1035 Yellowstone Ave
Pocatello, ID
 
Idaho Camera
(208) 344-8303
170 N 8th St
Boise, ID
 
Idaho Camera
(208) 375-5220
350 N Milwaukee St
Boise, ID
 
Idaho Camera
(208) 375-5220
350 N Milwaukee St
Boise, ID
 
Vista Village Shopping Center
(208) 343-8075
Boise, ID
 
Inkley's
(208) 734-9052
708 Blue Lakes Blvd N
Twin Falls, ID
 
Kits Cameras One Hour Photo
(208) 882-8567
Palouse Empire Mall
Moscow, ID
 
Boise Towne Square
(208) 375-5220
Boise, ID
 

First Look: Olympus E-30

First Look: Olympus E-30

Aimed squarely at enthusiasts, the latest SLR from Olympus offers several unique capabilities for creative expression

The new E-30 fits into the Olympus D-SLR line-up between the pro E-3 and advanced-amateur E-520 models, but closer to the E-3. It offers the most megapixels of any Olympus D-SLR and is loaded with features aimed at the creative artist who likes to go beyond the straight shot. Like the E-3 and E-520, the E-30 incorporates sensor-shift image stabilization that works with all lenses. And like all Olympus E-System D-SLRs, the E-30 offers the proven Olympus-pioneered Supersonic Wave Filter sensor-dust reduction system, Shadow Adjustment Technology (automatically controls shadows and highlights) and multiple wireless flash capability.

Other Features
Art Effect Filters
The E-30 provides six Art Effect Filters. The Soft Focus filter produces a dreamy diffusion effect; the Pop Art filter emphasizes bright colors for a hyper-saturated look; the Grainy Film filter produces a grainy, high-contrast monochrome image; the Pale & Light filter produces a now-popular desaturated effect; the Pin Hole filter gives a vignetted “toy-camera” look; and the Light Tone filter produces a soft-lit effect. Art Filters are activated via the camera’s mode dial, and their effects can be seen in real-time on the Live View LCD monitor.
Live View Multi-Exposure
The E-30 makes multiple-exposure composite photos easy. Just call up a saved image on the Live View monitor, then record a new image onto it. You also can merge recorded RAW images in-camera using the Multiple Exposure edit mode. You can combine up to four images into a single photo with this feature.

Click here to read the rest of this article from Digital Photo Magazine

Olympus E-620 DSLR

Olympus E-620 DSLR

Compact body, Live View LCD, and more

CENTER VALLEY, Pa., February 24, 2009 – As children, our imaginations run wild and finger-painted artistic creations are proudly displayed on our family refrigerators. But as we grow older, we learn to color inside the lines, and have less and less time for art. We often lose touch with how satisfying it is to create something uniquely our own. Olympus delivers the new E-620 digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera to bring back that free-style experimenting and the magical feeling of being inspired by our own art.

The new camera’s easy-to-use Art Filters and Multiple Exposures (built right into the camera) are fun for consumers – whether you’ve been shooting for years or picked up your first digital camera today. Enjoy capturing creative images on the go – without being tethered to a computer and editing software! Now it is possible to easily customize your images so they’re worthy of posting on the gallery wall (or at least the family fridge).

“Experimenting and creating your own unique masterpieces has never been easier or more fun,” said John Knaur, senior marketing manager, Digital SLR, Olympus Imaging America Inc. “Pop Art, Grainy Black & White, and Pin Hole are just a few creative options that can be effortlessly found on the camera’s mode dial. The access is easy, and the results are fun and limitless.”

The new camera’s freedom of expression is matched by its freedom of mobility. First, the camera travels with you to more places, thanks to its compact size and light 16.76-ounce body. Second, as the world’s smallest DSLR with in-body Image Stabilization, the E-620 adjusts when your body moves to remove blur caused by camera shake (with any lens attached). Finally, add Live View shooting with a swivel 2.7-inch HyperCrystal™ LCD that frees you to cover subjects from a range of angles, and this 12.3-megapixel DSLR seamlessly combines motions with emotions – proof that Olympus lets you capture it all.

Make Your Vision Come to Life with Art Filters
If you’re hoping to get more out of your camera than simply capturing and documenting a scene, and enjoy enhancing or customizing an image to make it your own, then you will value the camera’s Art Filters. The filters, which are built into the camera, provide incredible individual artistic control over an image, and remove the need to spend time altering images on the computer with editing software.

This camera was made for free-style shooting, experimenting and engaging with events and subjects. Enjoy the freedom of Autofocus Live View and dramatic effects to transform your day-to-day shots into compositions that you can be proud of with the following in-camera Art Filters:

Click here to read the rest of this article from Digital Photo Magazine

Olympus EVOLT E-330

Olympus EVOLT E-330

The tilting live-view LCD monitor meets the D-SLR

Olympus EVOLT E-330

I love digital SLRs and do just about all my shooting with them. D-SLRs have a couple of drawbacks, however. Dust can settle on the image sensor each time you change lenses, and you can't see the image live on the LCD monitor or tilt the monitor for odd-angle shots as you can with compact digital cameras.

The new Olympus EVOLT E-330 is a D-SLR that eliminates both problems. Its Supersonic Wave Filter (a feature shared with all Olympus E-series D-SLRs) automatically vibrates dust off the image sensor every time you switch on the camera. It's very effective: I've never noticed a dust spot in any of the more than 5,000 images I've shot with Olympus D-SLRs. The camera's big, 2.5-inch Live View LCD monitor (a feature unique to the E-330 among D-SLRs) not only shows the image live as you compose, but it also pulls away from the body and tilts up and down for easy high- and low-angle shooting.

I still generally prefer to focus and compose in the time-honored SLR way, using the SLR viewfinder rather than an external LCD monitor. But there are times when the consumer-style live-viewing and tilting monitor is very useful. For example, I like to shoot straight up with wide-angle lenses to record geometric patterns created by power lines and such. But my back doesn't like it, especially when I crouch down to get more of a power pylon in the shot. With the E-330, I tilt the LCD monitor up and compose comfortably standing or crouching. I also found the tilting monitor handy for low-level shots and for aerial photos. The plane I usually shoot from has a little side window that can be opened in flight, and with a conventional eye-level SLR finder, shooting through it is a bit awkward. With the E-330, I can compose using the monitor without slouching forward at the controls.

Live View operation is simple. When you want to use it, just press the Live View button next to the viewfinder eyepiece. There are two Live View modes, A and B, easily activated by pressing the A/B button next to the Live View button, then rotating the main dial to choose A or B.

In A mode, you get Full-Time Live View: The LCD monitor works like the one on a compact digital camera, showing the image live and in real time. The AF system functions in the normal manner or you can focus manually. But be sure to close the eyepiece shutter when your eye isn't at the eyepiece to keep stray light from entering and causing erroneous exposures.

Click here to read the rest of this article from Digital Photo Magazine