Digital Cameras for Beginners Seattle WA

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Cameras West
(206) 622-0066
Kits Camera CW 1908 4th Avenue
Seattle, WA
 
Cameras West
(425) 641-6677
Ross Plaza 14309 NE 20th
Bellevue, WA
 
Kits Cameras
(425) 641-6224
Kits Camera 12816 SE 38th Street
Bellevue, WA
 
Kits Cameras
(425) 771-7720
Kits Camera 3000 184th Street SW
Lynnwood, WA
 
Corbis
(206) 373-6000
710 2nd Ave.,
Seattle, WA
 
Kits Cameras
(206) 932-4190
Jefferson Square 4726 42nd Avenue SW
Seattle, WA
 
Kits Cameras
(206) 364-6224
Northgate Mall 401 NE Northgate Way
Seattle, WA
 
Cameras West
(206) 575-1775
Cameras West 17420 South Center Parkway
Tukwila, WA
 
Kits Camera
(253) 638-0132
Covington Place 27111 167th Place S.E. Suite 101
Covington, WA
 
Talls Camera
(206) 365-0604
Northgate Mall
Seattle, WA
 

Choosing The Right Digital Camera For You

Choosing The Right Digital Camera For You

How to narrow the multitude of options? Consider your photography habits and the features you really need


Canon EOS-1 At the other end of the aperture range, few compact-camera lenses stop down beyond ƒ/8. Why? Diffraction. When apertures become very small, light tends to bend around the aperture edge, causing a loss of image sharpness. A 7.4mm lens set at ƒ/22 has an aperture diameter of 0.34mm—about 1⁄74 of an inch—lots of diffraction. At ƒ/8, the 7.4mm lens has an aperture diameter of 0.93mm—nearly three times as large, with much less diffraction. Due to the very short focal lengths of compact digital camera lenses, depth of field is very good, even at ƒ/8, so there's seldom a need for ƒ/22 anyway.

Size And Shape. A pocket camera obviously should fit in one's pocket, and smaller, lighter cameras are easier to carry around than larger, heavier ones. But smaller cameras can mean tinier controls that are harder to operate. When considering camera purchases, try holding the cameras and making settings to see how easy or difficult it is. How does the camera feel in shooting position and in carrying position?

Power Sources. Digital cameras can be powered by AA batteries, proprietary rechargeable batteries and some by AC power via an adapter (handy for indoor/studio work).

AA alkaline batteries are available just about anywhere but don't last long in digital-camera use. I'd go with a set of AA lithium batteries—they'll last a lot longer, have excellent shelf life and perform well in cold weather. There are also rechargeable AA batteries, a good option (don't try to recharge conventional nonrechargeable alkaline batteries).

Some rechargeable batteries hold a charge well, others don't. If you use rechargeable batteries, it's best to charge them the night before you go on a shoot. I'd also recommend having at least one spare battery set on hand (I have four spare batteries for my D-SLR), ready to go. If the battery in the camera dies and you don't have a spare, you're done shooting. Carrying the spare set in a warm pocket during cold weather will keep it ready to go.

Pixel Count. Ever since the first "megapixel" camera was produced, "megapixels" has been a key marketing item. A one-megapixel image is composed of 1,000,000 picture elements, or pixels.

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