Digital Camera Accessories Ellicott City MD

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Digital Camera Accessories. You will find informative articles about Digital Camera Accessories, including "Buyer's Guide 2007: Digital Camera Accessories Matter!". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Ellicott City, MD that can help answer your questions about Digital Camera Accessories.

Ritz Camera
(410) 997-3011
The Mall in Columbia 10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Columbia, MD
 
Ritz Camera
(301) 260-0404
Olney Gardens Plaza 3120 Olney/Sandy Spring Road
Olney, MD
 
Ritz Camera
(301) 419-3200
12200 Baltimore Avenue
Beltsville, MD
 
Ritz Camera
(301) 592-0688
Burnt Mills Shopping Center 10737 Colulmbia Pike
Silver Spring, MD
 
Service Photo Supply Inc
(410) 235-6200
3838 Falls Rd
Baltimore, MD
 
Ritz Camera
(410) 766-5550
Marley Station 7900 Ritchie Highway
Glen Burnie, MD
 
Ritz Camera
(410) 296-1585
Kenilworth Park Mall 854 Kenilworth Drive
Towson, MD
 
Ritz Camera
(410) 785-8978
Hunt Valley Towne Center 112 Shawan Road Suite 10
Hunt Valley, MD
 
Baltimore Photo - Electronic Services
(410) 484-2345
1726 Reisterstown Rd
Baltimore, MD
 
Digital Express
(410) 296-1679
1515 N Charles St
Baltimore, MD
 

Buyer's Guide 2007: Digital Camera Accessories Matter!

Buyer's Guide 2007: Digital Camera Accessories Matter!

The right selection of gear will make shooting easier and more successful

Buyer's Guide 2007: Digital Camera Accessories Matter

Many accessories can help make your shooting life easier and your photos better. From camera bags, photo backpacks and cases to tripods, batteries and more, here are a few important ones.

Carrying Your Gear
It's great to have a lot of photo gear, but it brings up the question of how to take the items you need to where you need them.

Camera bags are the most common method of transport. Bags let you keep your gear together and carry it easily. Things to look for are protection for the gear (closed-cell foam, ballistic nylon and waterproof fabric are pluses), ease of carrying (how it feels with the strap slung across your shoulder, how easy it is to lift out of the car trunk), and how well the interior can be configured for your equipment. Some photographers have two bags: a larger one to transport everything and a smaller one to carry just the items they need when traveling light.

Photo backpacks offer the advantages of carrying more gear more easily and leaving both arms free. Some photo backpacks have a compartment for a laptop computer, which is handy for the ever-growing number of digital photographers who like to take a computer everywhere they go. The main drawback of photo backpacks is that with most, you have to remove the pack to get at your gear. One exception is Tenba's Shootout series, with its QuickAccess pockets.

Photo vests are convenient for smaller items, such as memory cards, film, filters, compact lenses and "pocket" cameras. Vests are great if you have a lot of these items to carry, but you'll still need a bag if you intend to carry large lenses or an additional camera body.

Waist packs, hip packs and belt packs provide easy access to gear, but be sure to balance the gear around your body-packing a waist pack so most of the weight is on one hip can result in leg or back strain.

Hard cases provide good impact protection, and larger ones will hold a lot of gear. Cases are great for shipping gear to locations, but not as convenient as bags once in the field. If you do a lot of traveling, hard cases with wheels are a lot easier to move around smooth surfaces like airport parking lots.


Slik Tripod Support In the Field
If you want the sharpest possible photos, you need a good tripod. Besides holding the camera rock-steady so that camera shake doesn't affect image sharpness, a tripod will lock in your composition so you can carefully examine it and so you won't accidentally change it as you capture the shot. That's three great benefits in one device.

A tripod must be sturdy, or it's useless. A good test is to extend the legs full length, then press down on the tripod head. If the tripod sags or collapses, you don't want it.

But if a tripod is too heavy or unwieldy, you'll probably wind up leaving it at home. Fortunately, there are tripods that...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Digital Photo Magazine